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Radio Frequency Reduction (Temperature Controlled Radiofrequ

Nov 30, 2016Posted by nameless

What Is Temperature Controlled Radiofrequency?

Temperature Controlled Radiofrequency is a turbinate reduction treatment.  Turbinates are spongy tissue covered curved bones inside the nasal passages that help condition the temperature and humidity of the air for entrance into the windpipe.  Sometimes one or more turbinates can become enlarged due to chronic nasal problems, such as allergic rhinitis, and block the nasal passageways.   Temperature Controlled Radiofrequency is a state-of-the-art non-surgical procedure that reduces the size of the turbinates and allows the patient to breath normally again.

What Happens During the Procedure?

During Temperature Controlled Radiofrequency, a highly skilled and trained surgeon places a small electrode into the nasal passageway, which is then used to heat and decrease the size of the turbinates.  Because the treatment is temperature controlled, it is very safe.  The surgeon will be able to administer just the right amount of heat precisely the right place. Most often, the procedure can be completed in one day and the patient does not have to stay in the hospital overnight.

What Happens After the Procedure?

After the procedure, the only well to tell the patient has even undergone treatment by looking up into the nostrils.  The patient will be given some medication to take to ensure a safe and comfortable recovery.  Most patients will experience nasal discharge that will eventually subside.

Possible Complications

Though Temperature Controlled Radio Frequency is a very safe procedure, there is always the possibly of complications. Some patients may experience dizziness, nausea and or vomiting post-procedure.   Excessive nasal discharge and or infection are also possible.

1 Larian, Babak. Center for Advanced Head and Neck Surgery website (2012). Nasal Airway Obstructions. Accessed 10 Nov. 2013.

2 Larian, Babak. Center for Advanced Head and Neck Surgery website (2012). Nasal Airway Obstructions. Accessed 10 Nov. 2013.

3 Turbinates Resource Center website (2011, Dec. 14). Turbinates. Accessed 10 Nov. 2013.

4 Larian, Babak. Center for Advanced Head and Neck Surgery website (2012). Nasal Airway Obstructions. Accessed 10 Nov. 2013.

5 Larian, Babak. Center for Advanced Head and Neck Surgery website (2012). Nasal Airway Obstructions. Accessed 10 Nov. 2013.

6 Turbinates Resource Center website (2011, Dec. 14). Turbinates. Accessed 10 Nov. 2013.

7 Turbinates Resource Center website (2011, Dec. 14). Turbinates. Accessed 10 Nov. 2013.